Trademark
 Dilution

A trademark is diluted when the use of similar or identical trademarks in other non‐competing markets means that the trademark in and of itself will lose its capacity to signify a single source. In other words, unlike ordinary trademark law, dilution protection extends to trademark uses that do not confuse consumers regarding who has made a product. Instead, dilution protection law aims to protect sufficiently strong trademarks from losing their singular association in the public mind with a particular product, perhaps imagined if the trademark were to be encountered independently of any product (e.g., just the word Pepsi spoken, or on a billboard). Under trademark law, dilution occurs either when unauthorized use of a mark “blurs” the “distinctive nature of the mark” or “tarnishes it.” Likelihood of confusion is not required. 15 U.S.C §§ 1127, 1125©.

2017-07-17T17:56:18+00:00December 12th, 2011|All, Blog, Trademarks|